Spring Break and Summer Campouts

SPRING BREAK AND SUMMER CAMPOUTS

Spring Break in March is normally the first campout that the new scout that just cross over to Boy Scout can attend.  While this may be difficult for the new scout being away from home for the first time, it is normally more difficult for the parents of the new scout.  Spring Break normally is a 4-5 day campout with a cost of approximately $125 -$150 a scout/leader depending on where we go plus gas money which has ranged around $25-35 depending on gas prices.

Summer Camp is normally in June for a week.  The cost is approximately $200-$250 a scout/leader depending on where we go plus gas money which has ranged around $25-35 depending on gas prices.

Adults who wish to attend campouts

Only parents or significant other with the approval of the other parent, or legal guardian will be permitted to attend campouts.  Any of the above can attend one campout without completing the BSA Youth Protection & Health and Safety course.  After attending one campout without these courses that person is required to complete the BSA Youth Protection & Health and Safety course before attending any other campouts.

What are the Adult Requirements and who will be permitted to attend campouts?

  1. The first and foremost reason why an adult would be interested in going is to offer assistance in teaching and broadening the boy’s quest to learn more about scouting.  We must keep in mind the main reason for your son’s involvement in scouts is for him to develop independence, learn what he can achieve on his own, work on challenges that he would not ordinarily have, build camaraderie amongst other scouts and live the Scout Oath and Law.
  2. Must complete the BSA Youth Protection & Health and Safety Course if you have already attended one campout.  Your objective should be to share your knowledge and expertise to the entire troop.  You are not there to baby sit or only spend time with your son.  By the mere fact that you are there will speak volumes to your son and also allow him to demonstrate his scouting skills.  You must be there to teach the boys in the troop an activity, skill, a merit badge or work on rank advancement.  The boys are also there to have fun and learn new things.  Campouts should be a combination of fun and working on and learning new skills on scouting.

What are the rules of sharing tents?

 

  1. When camping, no youth is permitted to sleep in the tent of an adult other than his own parent or guardian.
  2. Male and female leaders must have separate sleeping facilities.
  3. Married couples may share the same quarter if appropriate facilities are available.

The above 3 statements can be found under the Youth Protection & Adult Leadership Guide to Safe Scouting.  When the campsite permits, Boy Scouts are in one area, male adults are in another and female adults are in another.